Arctic Meltdown in 2018? “The methane will initially be felt most strongly in the Arctic, further speeding up the temperature rise that is already accelerating.” / NASA Worldview / How the US Occupied the 30% of Syria Containing Most of its Oil, Water and Gas / The Truth About Diego Garcia 


The ARCTIC: The Svalbard Islands Norway, the Berents Sea & Novaya Zemlya Russia (above) / April 18, 2018. The contrast & saturation are enhanced for clarity of detail.  Colors not true. Note the melting ice chunks and ‘spiral-coil’ cloud forms.  Novaya Zemlya is where the Russians did their 1961 nuclear bomb experiments, the Tsar Bomba.  http://tsarbomba.org/                                                                                            https://go.nasa.gov/2JZ3ZJh

The ARCTIC: Greenland (on top), Iceland, Svalbard Norway, the Norwegian Sea, the Barents Sea, Novaya Zemlya Russia (above) April 18, 2018. An overview with no contrast etc. enhancements.                                                                                  https://go.nasa.gov/2Hetc4U

The NORTON SOUND, northern ALASKA (above) / April 18, 2018. No enhancements. https://go.nasa.gov/2vsyRP9

ARCTIC NEWS: Heat Storm

Arctic sea ice extent has been at a record low for the time of year for most of 2018, as illustrated by above image. In 2012, extent went below 3.4 million km². The question is what minimum 2018 extent will be.

Arctic sea ice could disappear altogether in 2018.

Alaska & the Bering Strait (above) / April 18, 2018. The contrast and saturation, etc. are maxed/enhanced so the details appear with greater clarity. You can view the original images at the link below.                                                                                            https://go.nasa.gov/2vopK2c

What drives volume decline is the combination of extent loss and especially thickness loss. Sea ice thickness has declined particularly where the ice once was at its thickest, i.e. north of Greenland and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

The influx of warm water from the Atlantic Ocean and from the Pacific Ocean is melting the sea ice from below, while sunlight is melting the sea ice from above. Furthermore, warm water from rivers that end in the Arctic Ocean also contribute to melting of the sea ice, and there are numerous feedbacks that can dramatically speed up melting.

Disappearance of the sea ice means that the buffer that until now has consumed huge amounts of heat, will be gone and that heat that previously went into melting the sea ice, will instead warm up the Arctic.

Sea ice can be expected to continue its downward spiral, given the continued rise of the temperature of the sea surface in the North Atlantic Ocean and the North Pacific Ocean …

Alaska, the Bering Sea & the Bering Strait (above) / April 18, 2018.             https://go.nasa.gov/2Ha37Qa

The sea surface is not necessarily the place where the water is at its warmest. …
The temperature rise in the Arctic is causing decline of the sea ice extent as well as the extent of the snow cover on land. … Heat waves combined with strong rainfall due to storms could devastate the snow cover in 2018.

Decline of the snow and ice cover in the Arctic comes with a huge loss in albedo, which means that huge amounts of sunlight that were previously reflected back into space instead get absorbed by the Arctic. …
A rapid rise in temperatures in the Arctic will also accelerate changes to jet stream, which can cause huge amounts of heat from the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean to enter the Arctic Ocean, further speeding up the temperature rise and threatening to destabilize methane hydrates in sediments under the Arctic Ocean.

The methane will initially be felt most strongly in the Arctic, further speeding up the temperature rise that is already accelerating due to the loss of the snow and ice cover in the Arctic, which makes that less sunlight is reflected back into space and instead adds to warming up the Arctic.

https://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2018/04/heat-storm.html

Svalbard Norway, the BERENTS Sea, and Novaya Zemlya Russia (above) / April 17, 2018. The contrast and saturation, etc. are maxed/enhanced so the details appear with greater clarity. You can view the original images at the link below.
https://go.nasa.gov/2H9q7CW

The BERENTS Sea and Novaya Zemlya Russia (above) / April 17, 2018. The contrast and saturation, etc. are maxed/enhanced so the details appear with greater clarity. There is oil in the Berents Sea. The Norweigans and Russians have already made contractual agreements to extract.
https://go.nasa.gov/2H5XlTY

How the US Occupied the 30% of Syria Containing Most of its Oil, Water and Gas

While gaining control of key resources for partitioning Syria and destabilizing the government in Damascus, the U.S.’ main goal in occupying the oil and water rich northeastern Syria is aimed not at Syria but at Iran.
By Whitney Webb / April 17, 2018 “Information Clearing House” [excerpts]

DAMASCUS, SYRIA –   After the U.S. launched “limited” airstrikes on Friday against Syria, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley announced that the U.S. will maintain its illegal presence in Syria until U.S. goals in the area are fulfilled, opening the door for the U.S. occupation to continue indefinitely. …

Currently, the U.S. occupies nearly a third of Syrian territory — around 30 percent — including much of the area east of the Euphrates River, encompassing large swaths of the Deir Ezzor, Al-Hasakah and Raqqa regions. Though the U.S. currently has between 2,000 to 4,000 troops stationed in Syria, it announced the training of a 30,000-person-strong “border force” composed of U.S.-allied Kurds and Arabs in the area, which would be used to prevent northeastern Syria from coming under the control of Syria’s legitimate government. … along with the U.S. government’s insistence on maintaining the occupation until Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is removed from power, shows that the U.S. government has no intention of permitting the reunification of Syria and will continue to occupy the region over the long term. …

Northeastern Syria is an important region owing to its rich natural resources, particularly fossil fuels in the form of natural gas and oil. Indeed, this area contains 95 percent of all Syrian oil and gas potential — including al-Omar, the country’s largest oil field. Prior to the war, these resources produced some 387,000 barrels of oil per day and 7.8 billion cubic meters of natural gas annually, and were of great economic importance to the Syrian government. However, more significantly, nearly all the existing Syrian oil reserves – estimated at around 2.5 billion barrels – are located in the area currently occupied by the U.S. government. …

With the U.S. now occupying the area, the oil and gas produced in this region are already benefiting U.S. energy corporations to which Trump and his administration have numerous ties. According to Yeni Şafak, the U.S. along with the Saudis, Egypt, and Kurdish officials held meetings where decisions were made to extract, process and market the fossil fuels harvested in the region, with the Kurds being given a handsome share of the profits. As of 2015, the Kurds were said to be earning in excess of $10 million every month. Syria’s Kurdistan exports its oil to Iraq’s Kurdistan, with which it conveniently shares a border, and it is then refined and sold to Turkey. Though no corporations are publicly involved, the deal between Syrian and Iraqi Kurds was brokered by unnamed “oil experts” and “oil investors.” The Kurds in Syria and Iraq did not even sign the agreement in person. They were subsequently “informed” of the agreement by the United States and instructed to supervise the operation.

… even though Tillerson has now gone, his replacement, Mike Pompeo, is equally a friend to the U.S. oil and gas industry. Pompeo is the “#1 all time recipient” of money from Koch Industries, which has numerous interests in oil and gas exploration, drilling, pipelines, and fossil-fuel refining. …

Beyond fossil fuels and pipelines, northeast Syria boasts several other key advantages in terms of resources. Chief among those is water – a resource of prime importance in the Middle East. The U.S.-controlled portion of Syria is home to the country’s three largest freshwater reservoirs, which are fed by the Euphrates river. One of those reservoirs now controlled by the U.S. and its proxies, Lake Assad, is the country’s largest freshwater reservoir and supplies government-held Aleppo with most of its drinking water. It also provides the city with much of its electrical power, which is generated by Tabqa Dam, also located in the occupied territory. Another key hydroelectric power plant is located at Tishrin Dam and is also controlled by U.S.-backed proxy forces.

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/49247.htm

 

Iceland, Svalbard Norway, the BERENTS Sea, and Novaya Zemlya Russia (above) / April 17, 2018.                                                                                                               https://go.nasa.gov/2H6fYTz

Jan Mayen Island in the Barents Sea (above) / April 16, 2018. Note the massive miles of radiation. The image is sepia enhanced for clarity.
https://go.nasa.gov/2H7aQyH

Jan Mayen Island in the Barents Sea (above) / April 16, 2018. Note the massive miles of radiation – and very elongated ‘spiral-coil’ cloud forms, (similar to what we recently have seen in Antarctica). The image is slightly sepia enhanced for clarity.
https://go.nasa.gov/2H8yKxW

Jan Mayen Island in the Barents Sea (above) / April 16, 2018. Note the massive miles of radiation – and very elongated ‘spiral-coil’ cloud forms, (similar to what we recently have seen in Antarctica). The image is slightly sepia enhanced for clarity.  https://go.nasa.gov/2H4ILfx

The Truth About Diego Garcia 
And 50 Years of Fiction About an American Military Base 
/ By David Vine

The truth about the U.S. military base on the British-controlled Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia is often hard to believe. It would be easy enough to confuse the real story with fictional accounts of the island found in the Transformers movies, on the television series 24, and in Internet conspiracy theories about the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

While the grim saga of Diego Garcia frequently reads like fiction, it has proven all too real for the people involved. It’s the story of a U.S. military base built on a series of real-life fictions told by U.S. and British officials over more than half a century. The central fiction is that the U.S. built its base on an “uninhabited” island. That was “true” only because the indigenous people were secretly exiled from the Chagos Archipelago when the base was built. Although their ancestors had lived there since the time of the American Revolution, Anglo-American officials decided, as one wrote, to “maintain the fiction that the inhabitants of Chagos [were] not a permanent or semi-permanent population,” but just “transient contract workers.” The same official summed up the situation bluntly: “We are able to make up the rules as we go along.” …

During the same period, Diego Garcia became a multi-billion-dollar Navy and Air Force base and a central node in U.S. military efforts to control the Greater Middle East and its oil and natural gas supplies. The base, which few Americans are aware of, is more important strategically and more secretive than the U.S. naval base-cum-prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. Unlike Guantánamo, no journalist has gotten more than a glimpse of Diego Garcia in more than 30 years. And yet, it has played a key role in waging the Gulf War, the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, and the current bombing campaign against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.

Following years of reports that the base was a secret CIA “black site” for holding terrorist suspects and years of denials by U.S. and British officials, leaders on both sides of the Atlantic finally fessed up in 2008. “Contrary to earlier explicit assurances,” said Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs David Miliband, Diego Garcia had indeed played at least some role in the CIA’s secret “rendition” program.

http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/176010/tomgram%3A_david_vine%2C_the_forgotten_costs_of_war_in_the_middle_east/#more

 

The Berents Sea & Norwegian Sea (above) / April 16, 2018. The image is slightly sepia enhanced. Have the major operations been moved from the Antarctica to the Arctic? Would this be a case of Russia & Norway collaborating?                                                      https://go.nasa.gov/2H4JAoj

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