The Buddhist & the Neuroscientist: What compassion does to the brain / DARPA: Nonsurgical Neural Interfaces Could Significantly Expand Use of Neurotechnology / “Just as solid state semiconductors form the basis of a solid state computer, gaseous plasmonic semiconductor material could be used to create a gaseous plasmonic computer in the atmosphere above our heads. This gaseous semiconductor in the sky substantially creates a computer in the sky, which can be programmed to accomplish any desire of the computer programmer in accordance with the computer software.”

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State with contrast maxed to show unnatural striated scalar wave cloud forms.

The Buddhist and the Neuroscientist
What compassion does to the brain

In 1992, the neuroscientist Richard Davidson got a challenge from the Dalai Lama. By that point, he’d spent his career asking why people respond to, in his words, “life’s slings and arrows” in different ways. Why are some people more resilient than others in the face of tragedy? And is resilience something you can gain through practice?

The Dalai Lama had a different question for Davidson when he visited the Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader at his residence in Dharamsala, India. “He said: ‘You’ve been using the tools of modern neuroscience to study depression, and anxiety, and fear. Why can’t you use those same tools to study kindness and compassion?’ … I did not have a very good answer. I said it was hard.”

The Dalai Lama was interested in what the tools of modern neuroscience could reveal about the brains of people who spent years, in Davidson’s words, “cultivating well-being … cultivating qualities of the mind which promote a positive outlook.” The result was that, not long afterward, Davidson brought a series of Buddhist monks into his lab and strapped electrodes to their heads or treated them to a few hours in an MRI machine.

“The best way to activate positive-emotion circuits in the brain is through generosity,” Davidson, who founded the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at University of Wisconsin, Madison, said in a talk at the Aspen Ideas Festival. “This is really a kind of exciting neuroscientific finding because there are pearls of wisdom in the contemplative tradition—the Dalai Lama frequently talks about this—that the best way for us to be happy is to be generous to others. And in fact the scientific evidence is in many ways bearing this out, and showing that there are systematic changes in the brain that are associated with acts of generosity.”

Davidson and his colleagues ran a simple experiment on eight “long-term Buddhist practitioners” whose had spent an average of 34,000 hours in mental training. They asked the subjects to alternate between a meditative state and a neutral state in order to observe how the brain changed. One subject described his meditation as generating “a state in which love and compassion permeate the whole mind, with no other consideration, reasoning, or discursive thoughts.”

“When we did this, we noticed something remarkable,” Davidson said. “What we see are these high-amplitude gamma-oscillations in the brain, which are indicative of plasticity”—meaning that those brains were more capable of change, for example, in theory, of becoming more resilient. The researchers also found in MRI scans of monks that a region of the brain known as the anterior insula was activated. “Every neuroscientist will have their favorite part of the brain,” Davidson said. The anterior insula is one of his, because it’s where a lot of brain-body coordination takes place.

“The systems in the brain that support our well-being are intimately connected to different organ systems in our body, and also connected to the immune and endocrine systems in ways that matter for our health,” he said. The brain scans showed that “compassion is a kind of state that involves the body in a major way.”

One example: Davidson and coauthors found in another study that meditation improved immune response to an influenza vaccine—and the subjects were not “professional” Buddhist meditators, but people who had gone through an eight-week training program in mindfulness meditation. And a short “compassion training” course, Davidson and colleagues found in a 2013 study, exhibited more altruistic behavior compared with a control group.

The study of Buddhist brains has burgeoned since Davidson first met the Dalai Lama. But it’s still not known precisely how compassion alters the brain to promote better health or better behavior. Gamma waves and lit up insula can only tell you so much about the linkages between the mind and the body, and, in turn, about what it really takes to think your way to a better character.*

Davidson’s research suggests, he said, that “we can all take responsibility for our brains.” In which case, cultivating responsibility itself might be the first step.

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/07/dalai-lama-neuroscience-compassion/397706/

Photo of a black book on a black marble table top in my house covered with nanosized metal particle ‘dust’ – aluminum, barium, etc. These nanoparticles are what we are breathing and are dispersed in our Earth’s atmosphere as the “milky haze” that has replaced blue skies.  Aluminum is known to cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Toxic ‘white-dust’ particles in my home! Aluminum, lithium, barium, strontium are just some of the metals that have been identified as part of the aerosol spraying of our atmosphere.

Meditation can Change Our Brain:

• Meditation can beneficially change the inner workings and circuitry of the brain, better known as “Neuroplasticity”.

• The happier parts of the brain (prefrontal cortex) were far more active.
• Their brains tend to “re-organize”, which means they feel a sense of “oneness” with the world around them.

• The brainwave patterns of the Buddhist monks were far more powerful, implying a higher level of external & internal thought.

• Their brains had enhanced focus, memory, learning, consciousness, and “neural coordination”.

• The monks had no anxiety, depression, addiction or anything of the sort.

• And this is just the tip of the iceberg, the benefits of meditation are limitless…

In short, the Buddhist monks brains were physically and functionally superior than those without meditation experience.  Researchers believe that meditation changes the brain in the same way exercise changes the body.

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State.

Detail of above photo with various contrast etc. adjustments to reveal cloud structures.

 

MR. ELECTROMAGNETICS:  By placing all of these semiconductor elements into gaseous plasma form, a semiconductor can be created on gaseous plasmonic form. Just as solid state semiconductors form the basis of a solid state computer, gaseous plasmonic semiconductor material could be used to create a gaseous plasmonic computer in the atmosphere above our heads.

This gaseous semiconductor in the sky substantially creates a computer in the sky, which can be programmed to accomplish any desire of the computer programmer in accordance with the computer software.  This would lead to a computer in the sky under computer software control. The computer can be programmed to allow objects to pass through this shield environment, or the computer can prevent something from passing through this defense shield.

Mr. ElectroMagnetics: ‘Depositing’ or Spraying A Computer in the Sky / By placing all of these semiconductor elements into gaseous plasma form, a semiconductor can be created on gaseous plasmonic form. Just as solid state semiconductors form the basis of a solid state computer, gaseous plasmonic semiconductor material could be used to create a gaseous plasmonic computer in the atmosphere above our heads.

 

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State. Some contrast etc. adjustments to reveal the scalar wave radiation spreading across the sky.

VSF: This DARPA report is classic Zeta Reticuli Invasion Agenda. For hybrids only?

DARPA: Nonsurgical Neural Interfaces Could Significantly Expand Use of Neurotechnology
New program seeks high-resolution neural interfaces for use by able-bodied Service members
outreach@darpa.mil
3/16/2018

Over the past two decades, the international biomedical research community has demonstrated increasingly sophisticated ways to allow a person’s brain to communicate with a device, allowing breakthroughs aimed at improving quality of life, such as access to computers and the internet, and more recently control of a prosthetic limb. DARPA has been at the forefront of this research.

The state of the art in brain-system communications has employed invasive techniques that allow precise, high-quality connections to specific neurons or groups of neurons. These techniques have helped patients with brain injury and other illnesses. However, these techniques are not appropriate for able-bodied people. DARPA now seeks to achieve high levels of brain-system communications without surgery, in its new program, Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3).

“DARPA created N3 to pursue a path to a safe, portable neural interface system capable of reading from and writing to multiple points in the brain at once,” said Dr. Al Emondi, program manager in DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office (BTO). “High-resolution, nonsurgical neurotechnology has been elusive, but thanks to recent advances in biomedical engineering, neuroscience, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology, we now believe the goal is attainable.”

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State. Some contrast etc. adjustments to reveal the scalar wave radiation covering the sky.

Noninvasive neurotechnologies such as the electroencephalogram and transcranial direct current stimulation already exist, but offer nowhere near the precision, signal resolution, and portability required for advanced applications by people working in real-world settings. Potential N3 researchers will face numerous scientific and engineering challenges to bypass those limitations, but by far the biggest obstacle will be overcoming the complex physics of scattering and weakening of signals as they pass through skin, skull, and brain tissue.

“We’re asking multidisciplinary teams of researchers to construct approaches that enable precise interaction with very small areas of the brain, without sacrificing signal resolution or introducing unacceptable latency into the N3 system,” Emondi said. The only technologies that will be considered in N3 must have a viable path toward eventual use in healthy human subjects.

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State.  Some contrast etc. adjustments to reveal the scalar wave radiation covering the sky.

If early program deliverables overcome the physics challenges, along with the barriers of crosstalk and low signal-to-noise ratio, subsequent program goals would include developing algorithms for decoding and encoding neural signals, integrating sensing and stimulation subcomponents into a single device, evaluating the safety and efficacy of the system in animal models, and ultimately testing the technology with human volunteers.

DARPA intends the four-year N3 effort to conclude with a demonstration of a bidirectional system being used in a defense-relevant task that could include human-machine interactions with unmanned aerial vehicles, active cyber defense systems, or other properly instrumented Department of Defense systems.  If successful, N3 technology could ultimately find application in these and other areas that would benefit from improved human-machine interaction, such as partnering humans with computer systems to keep pace with the anticipated speed and complexity of future military missions.

“Smart systems will significantly impact how our troops operate in the future, and now is the time to be thinking about what human-machine teaming will actually look like and how it might be accomplished,” Emondi said. “If we put the best scientists on this problem, we will disrupt current neural interface approaches and open the door to practical, high-performance interfaces.”

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State.  Sepia, saturation, and contrast etc. adjustments to reveal the scalar wave radiation covering the sky.

DARPA has invited federal regulators to participate from the beginning of the N3 program, serving as aids for researchers to help them better understand regulatory perspectives as they begin to develop technologies. Later in the program, these regulators will again serve as a resource to guide strategies for submitting applications, as needed, for Investigational Device Exemptions and Investigational New Drugs.

DARPA is being similarly proactive in considering the ethical, legal, and social dimensions of more ubiquitous neurotechnology and how it might affect not only military operations, but also society at large. Independent legal and ethical experts advised the agency as the N3 program was being formed, and will continue to help DARPA think through new scenarios that arise as N3 technologies take shape. These individuals will also help to foster broader dialogue about how to maximize societal benefit from those new technologies.

Separately, proposers to N3 must also describe mechanisms for identifying and addressing potential ethical and legal implications of their work. As the research advances, published N3 results will further facilitate broad consideration of emerging technologies.
https://www.darpa.mil/news-events/2018-03-16

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State.  Some contrast adjustments.

My photo taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State.  Some contrast adjustments.

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