The Graphene 666 Mind Control System / Celeste Solum / DARPA: Funding Wearable Brain-Machine Interfaces / Reliable Peripheral Interfaces / COVID Biosensors, DARPA Microchips & Smart Dust Are All Very Real / Atom-width graphene sensors could provide unprecedented insights into brain structure and function / Graphene-based neurotechnologies for advanced neural interfaces

Above: July 3, 2021 / NASA Worldview/ Off the West Coast of North America / Contrast & sepia enhanced

VSF: When you look the events that are happening on our planet from the perspective of the Draco/Zeta BioInvasion, then it all fits together. The old human form is being changed to suit the soul group of the Zeta Reticuli Grey races. Using the technologies that are diversely described as potentially “beneficial”, our DNA is being altered through the vaccines, the PCR tests, 5G, scalarwave and microwave technology, the chemicals in our food, water and air.

Geoengineering is playing a major role in the Alien Agenda. I am not the only one to consider that this graphene oxide material has been profusely distributed through the aerosol spray ops. Graphene oxide has been discovered in all four vaccines, the PCR tests and the masks. Even though some of these articles say that graphene oxide is not toxic, there are other reports that indicate it is highly toxic.

We are being turned into antennae/receivers interconnected to a control system without our consent. Note that much of the research on neuro-interfacing is done by the Chinese. But never doubt that this is a planetary, meaning worldwide endeavor. In my understanding the seat of the Zeta Reticuli Grey power base is in China, while the Draco Reptilians are underground in Zionist Israel.

Many of these neural brain interface neurotechnology projects are being sold to us as medical and prosthetic benefits. But it always comes down to military uses — which is how they get the funding. There is nothing beneficial to humans in these technologies. They are indeed creating the HIVE MIND that is preferred by the Zetas.

Our Refuge is a Higher Consciousness!

“This whole universe has come into existence just to carry you to God consciousness.”   – Swami Lakshmanjoo, The Shiva Sutras

Quotes from E.M. Nicolay

E.M. Nicolay: “…the Zeta Greys particularly, have little or no capability for understanding or processing individual freedoms, let alone emotions. Thus they have no real capacity for empathy. This inability to empathize or understand the desire for freedom or expression of emotion experienced by humans combined with a hefty dose of contempt for Earth’s human species … inclines them towards justifying the use of any and all means …”

E.M. Nicolay: “Sadly, those who are not enlightened with respect to the power of creation they hold within their Will … are destined to be subject to the interference of all entities that resonate at a lower vibrational frequency or level of consciousness.”

E.M. Nicolay: Those … who laugh off the Zetas’ efforts to keep Earth at second and third density have no understanding of the betrayal they are serving on the human Soul matrices.”

E.M. Nicolay says that we in fact have been invaded, but not from outer space as we have often seen in science fiction films. The alien conquest of Earth is being attempted from within the human form itself — a Bio-Invasion. “The potential exists for alien Souls and Souls not related to Human Angelic to incarnate into physical human bodies through the use of emerging hybrid genetics and DNA manipulation.”

https://www.bitchute.com/channel/g5bLcCrLu8gt/

Celeste Solum @23:50 in video above – My notes:

a magnetic beacon inside us
biologically changed and owned
Covid is the first deployment of a new life form.
They don’t want anything of the old world 
All old human life forms eradicated
They want a new life form
By 2025
They have learned how to fuse biological life and robotics
Extermination of the old life form
Any human from now on has to be engineered
in laboratories and enhanced & augmented
and part of the Matrix
They are retooling and rewiring our bodies
Each one of us right now has 20,000 to 30,000 nanoparticles
[The graphene oxide is being distributed in the geoengineering aerosol spray ops]
They wanted to put chips in peoples brains, but not with surgery.
So they came up with the hydrogel or called quantum dot (Gates).
With the vaccine, you get it injected into you and then it assembles.
It’s self-assembling [like plasma].
Then it swarms through your body and crosses your blood brain barrier.
And takes over your brain.
It harvests your fluid in your body, your moisture.
And it grows, and grows until we are no longer human.
We are confused. [Many reports of confusion now from the vaxxed!]
We are nodes in the quantum computer. [Hive-mind]
The biological self dies, because there is nothing left.
Say NO to the text and the jab!
Deployed nano-sim particles in our bodies 
which get their marching orders from frequencies
that are being aimed at us 
Bio-accumulative. Stays in your body.

DARPA: Funding Wearable Brain-Machine Interfaces

Technocrats at DARPA are intent on creating a non-surgical brain-machine interface as a force-multiplier for soldiers. The research will require “Investigational Device Exemptions” from the Administration. ⁃ TN Editor
DARPA has awarded funding to six organizations to support the Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program, first announced in March 2018. Battelle Memorial Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), Rice University, and Teledyne Scientific are leading multidisciplinary teams to develop high-resolution, bidirectional brain-machine interfaces for use by able-bodied service members. These wearable interfaces could ultimately enable diverse national security applications such as control of active cyber defense systems and swarms of unmanned aerial vehicles, or teaming with computer systems to multitask during complex missions.
“DARPA is preparing for a future in which a combination of unmanned systems, artificial intelligence, and cyber operations may cause conflicts to play out on timelines that are too short for humans to effectively manage with current technology alone,” said Al Emondi, the N3 program manager.  
“By creating a more accessible brain-machine interface that doesn’t require surgery to use, DARPA could deliver tools that allow mission commanders to remain meaningfully involved in dynamic operations that unfold at rapid speed.”
Over the past 18 years, DARPA has demonstrated increasingly sophisticated neurotechnologies that rely on surgically implanted electrodes to interface with the central or peripheral nervous systems. The agency has demonstrated achievements such as neural control of prosthetic limbs and restoration of the sense of touch to the users of those limbs, relief of otherwise intractable neuropsychiatric illnesses such as depression, and improvement of memory formation and recall. Due to the inherent risks of surgery, these technologies have so far been limited to use by volunteers with clinical need.
For the military’s primarily able-bodied population to benefit from neurotechnology, nonsurgical interfaces are required. Yet, in fact, similar technology could greatly benefit clinical populations as well. By removing the need for surgery, N3 systems seek to expand the pool of patients who can access treatments such as deep brain stimulation to manage neurological illnesses.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=eL1nG1O7z-c

The N3 teams are pursuing a range of approaches that use optics, acoustics, and electromagnetics to record neural activity and/or send signals back to the brain at high speed and resolution. The research is split between two tracks. Teams are pursuing either completely noninvasive interfaces that are entirely external to the body or minutely invasive interface systems that include nanotransducers that can be temporarily and nonsurgically delivered to the brain to improve signal resolution.
• The Battelle team, under principal investigator Dr. Gaurav Sharma, aims to develop a minutely invasive interface system that pairs an external transceiver with electromagnetic nanotransducers that are nonsurgically delivered to neurons of interest. The nanotransducers would convert electrical signals from the neurons into magnetic signals that can be recorded and processed by the external transceiver, and vice versa, to enable bidirectional communication.
• The Carnegie Mellon University team, under principal investigator Dr. Pulkit Grover, aims to develop a completely noninvasive device that uses an acousto-optical approach to record from the brain and interfering electrical fields to write to specific neurons. The team will use ultrasound waves to guide light into and out of the brain to detect neural activity. The team’s write approach exploits the non-linear response of neurons to electric fields to enable localized stimulation of specific cell types.
• The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory team, under principal investigator Dr. David Blodgett, aims to develop a completely noninvasive, coherent optical system for recording from the brain. The system will directly measure optical path-length changes in neural tissue that correlate with neural activity.
• The PARC team, under principal investigator Dr. Krishnan Thyagarajan, aims to develop a completely noninvasive acousto-magnetic device for writing to the brain. Their approach pairs ultrasound waves with magnetic fields to generate localized electric currents for neuromodulation. The hybrid approach offers the potential for localized neuromodulation deeper in the brain.
• The Rice University team, under principal investigator Dr. Jacob Robinson, aims to develop a minutely invasive, bidirectional system for recording from and writing to the brain. For the recording function, the interface will use diffuse optical tomography to infer neural activity by measuring light scattering in neural tissue. To enable the write function, the team will use a magneto-genetic approach to make neurons sensitive to magnetic fields.
• The Teledyne team, under principal investigator Dr. Patrick Connolly, aims to develop a completely noninvasive, integrated device that uses micro optically pumped magnetometers to detect small, localized magnetic fields that correlate with neural activity. The team will use focused ultrasound for writing to neurons.
Throughout the program, the research will benefit from insights provided by independent legal and ethical experts who have agreed to provide insights on N3 progress and consider potential future military and civilian applications and implications of the technology. Additionally, federal regulators are cooperating with DARPA to help the teams better understand human-use clearance as research gets underway. As the work progresses, these regulators will help guide strategies for submitting applications for Investigational Device Exemptions and Investigational New Drugs to enable human trials of N3 systems during the last phase of the four-year program.
“If N3 is successful, we’ll end up with wearable neural interface systems that can communicate with the brain from a range of just a few millimeters, moving neurotechnology beyond the clinic and into practical use for national security,” Emondi said. “Just as service members put on protective and tactical gear in preparation for a mission, in the future they might put on a headset containing a neural interface, use the technology however it’s needed, then put the tool aside when the mission is complete.”

My photo of scalarwave cloud patterns taken from my home on the Olympic Peninsula Washington State

Reliable Peripheral Interfaces

The Reliable Peripheral Interfaces (RPI) effort seeks to demonstrate peripheral-nervous-system (PNS) interfaces that can reliably extract motor-control information for intuitive control of high-performance upper-limb prosthetics. This effort includes a variety of PNS-interface approaches such as nerve cuffs, penetrating electrode arrays, regenerative interfaces, tissue-engineered biological constructs, non-penetrating devices, invasive electromyography (EMG) and sensory-input (stimulation) systems. 

Area #1:  Create and demonstrate clinically viable reliable-tissue interfaces to peripheral nerves and muscles.  Investments were made in the development of ultra-compliant probes targeting the dorsal and ventral spinal nerve roots, miniature wireless implantable EMG systems, a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE), regenerative electrode technologies, and refinement of Utah slant electrode arrays (USEA) resulting in first-in-human demonstrations.  These peripheral interfaces must enable stable, robust and high-channel count extensive recording of limb-control-signal activity.   

Technical Area #2: Demonstrate the clinically viable tissue-interface electronics and packaging necessary to enable the development and testing of reliable peripheral interfaces designed to control many-DOF prosthetic limbs.  Efforts focused on implantable wireless systems for EMG recording and the high performance electronic microsystems for epineural recording.  
Technical Area #3:  Develop clinically viable algorithms and subsystems for reliably decoding limb-control information from the detected peripheral signals. Efforts in sparse PCA, Markov random fields, simultaneous decode of EMG, beam-forming, time-delayed artificial neural nets, and creating motor neuron pool models were launched.   

Technical Area #4:  Demonstrate an advanced peripheral-interface system that can accurately detect and decode peripheral limb-control signals in a manner that reliably results in significant functional benefit.  Human-use demonstrations of military-relevant and high-DOF control of a prosthetic limb using implantable EMG, surface EMG, and inter-neural recordings are expected.   

Technical Area #5: Demonstrate clinically viable systems that provide tactile sensory and/or proprioceptive limb feedback via stimulation of the peripheral nervous system.  Reliable stimulation of the peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion were demonstrated. 

RPI is one of three complementary efforts within DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology (RE-NET) program aimed at understanding why the performance of neural interfaces degrades over time and developing new high-performance neural interfaces that last the life of the patient.

https://www.darpa.mil/work-with-us/reliable-peripheral-interfaces

COVID Biosensors, DARPA Microchips & Smart Dust Are All Very Real

Atom-width graphene sensors could provide unprecedented insights into brain structure and function
by DARPA
DARPA has created a proof-of-concept tool that demonstrates much smaller, transparent contacts that can measure and stimulate neural tissue using electrical and optical methods at the same time. 
 Researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison developed the new technology with support from DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology (RE-NET) program. It is described in detail in a paper in Nature Communications.
“This technology demonstrates potentially breakthrough capabilities for visualizing and quantifying neural network activity in the brain,” said Doug Weber, DARPA program manager. “The ability to simultaneously measure electrical activity on a large and fast scale with direct visualization and modulation of neuronal network anatomy could provide unprecedented insight into relationships between brain structure and function—and importantly, how these relationships evolve over time or are perturbed by injury or disease.”
The new device uses graphene, a recently discovered form of carbon, on a flexible plastic backing that conforms to the shape of tissue. The graphene sensors are electrically conductive but only 4 atoms thick—less than 1 nanometer and hundreds of times thinner than current contacts. Its extreme thinness enables nearly all light to pass through across a wide range of wavelengths. Moreover, graphene is nontoxic to biological systems [???], an improvement over previous research into transparent electrical contacts that are much thicker, rigid, difficult to manufacture and reliant on potentially toxic metal alloys.
The technology demonstration draws upon three cutting-edge research fields: graphene, which earned researchers the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics; super-resolved fluorescent microscopy, which earned researchers the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry; and optogenetics, which involves genetically modifying cells to create specific light-reactive proteins.
… This technology provides the capability to modulate neural function, by applying programmed pulses of electricity or light to temporarily activate neurons. …

https://phys.org/news/2014-10-atom-width-graphene-sensors-unprecedented-insights.html

Graphene-based neurotechnologies for advanced neural interfaces

YichenLuXinLiuDuyguKuzum

Highlights

Transparent graphene electrode arrays enable multimodal neural interfaces.

Graphene with porous structure has high charge injection capacity and low impedance.

Graphene field-effect transistors have intrinsic amplification effect for high signal-to-noise ratio.

Graphene chemical sensors have low limit of detection and quick response.

Artifact-free closed-loop systems based on transparent graphene facilitate causal investigations of neural circuit functions.

Abstract
Understanding how neuron populations transform activities of individual neurons into complex behaviors is one of the biggest challenges of neuroscience research. However, current neural monitoring and controlling technologies provide insufficient spatiotemporal resolution to unravel neural circuit functions. To this end, multifunctional neurotechnologies combining electrical, optical and chemical sensing and stimulation modalities have been proposed to overcome resolution limits. Research in multifunctional probes has fueled the demand for new materials to build minimally invasive chronic interfaces to the brain. Graphene has recently emerged as a neural interface material offering several outstanding properties, such as optical transparency, flexibility, high conductivity, functionalization and biocompatibility. The unique combination of these properties in a single material system makes graphene an attractive choice for multi-modal probing of neural activity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in graphene-based neurotechnologies, highlight different approaches and consider emerging directions inspired by unique characteristics of graphene.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2468451118300096

New Graphene Sensors Could Provide Unprecedented Insights into Brain Structure
TOPICS:BionanotechnologyDARPAGrapheneNanotechnologyOptogeneticsUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
By DARPA November 3, 2014

Conventional metal electrode technologies (top left) are opaque, obstructing views of underlying neural tissue. DARPA’s RE-NET program has developed new graphene sensors that are electrically conductive but only 4 atoms thick—hundreds of times thinner than current contacts (top middle). Their extreme thinness enables nearly all light to pass through across a wide range of wavelengths. Placed on a flexible plastic backing that conforms to the shape of tissue (bottom), the sensors are part of a proof-of-concept tool that demonstrates much smaller, transparent contacts that can measure and stimulate neural tissue using electrical and optical methods at the same time (top right).

New nanotechnology funded by DARPA’s RE-NET program and developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison enables monitoring and stimulation of neurons using optical and electronic methods simultaneously.
Understanding the anatomical structure and function of the brain is a longstanding goal in neuroscience and a top priority of President Obama’s brain initiative. Electrical monitoring and stimulation of neuronal signaling is a mainstay technique for studying brain function, while emerging optical techniques—which use photons instead of electrons—are opening new opportunities for visualizing neural network structure and exploring brain functions. Electrical and optical techniques offer distinct and complementary advantages that, if used together, could offer profound benefits for studying the brain at high resolution. Combining these technologies is challenging, however, because conventional metal electrode technologies are too thick (>500 nm) to be transparent to light, making them incompatible with many optical approaches.
To help overcome these challenges, DARPA has created a proof-of-concept tool that demonstrates much smaller, transparent contacts that can measure and stimulate neural tissue using electrical and optical methods at the same time. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison developed the new technology with support from DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology (RE-NET). It is described in detail in a paper in Nature Communications.

“This technology demonstrates potentially breakthrough capabilities for visualizing and quantifying neural network activity in the brain,” said Doug Weber, DARPA program manager. “The ability to simultaneously measure electrical activity on a large and fast scale with direct visualization and modulation of neuronal network anatomy could provide unprecedented insight into relationships between brain structure and function—and importantly, how these relationships evolve over time or are perturbed by injury or disease.”
The new device uses graphene, a recently discovered form of carbon, on a flexible plastic backing that conforms to the shape of tissue. The graphene sensors are electrically conductive but only 4 atoms thick—less than 1 nanometer and hundreds of times thinner than current contacts. Its extreme thinness enables nearly all light to pass through across a wide range of wavelengths. Moreover, graphene is nontoxic to biological systems, an improvement over previous research into transparent electrical contacts that are much thicker, rigid, difficult to manufacture and reliant on potentially toxic metal alloys.
The technology demonstration draws upon three cutting-edge research fields: graphene, which earned researchers the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics; super-resolved fluorescent microscopy, which earned researchers the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry; and optogenetics, which involves genetically modifying cells to create specific light-reactive proteins.
RE-NET seeks to develop new tools and technologies to understand and overcome the failure mechanisms of neural interfaces. DARPA is interested in advancing next-generation neurotechnologies for revealing the relationship between neural network structure and function. RE-NET, and subsequent DARPA programs in this field, plan to leverage this new tool by simultaneously measuring the function, physical motion and behavior of neurons in freely moving subjects. This technology provides the capability to modulate neural function, by applying programmed pulses of electricity or light to temporarily activate neurons. Therefore, it could not only provide better observation of native functionality but also, through careful modulation of circuit activity, enable exploration of causal relationships between neural signals and brain function.

“Historically, researchers have been limited to correlational studies that suggest, but do not prove causal linkages between neural activity and behavior,” Weber said. “Now, we have the opportunity to directly see, measure and stimulate neural circuits to explore these relationships and develop and validate models of brain circuit function. This knowledge could greatly aid how we understand and treat brain injury and disease.”
The new device uses graphene, a recently discovered form of carbon, on a flexible plastic backing that conforms to the shape of tissue. The graphene sensors are electrically conductive but only 4 atoms thick—less than 1 nanometer and hundreds of times thinner than current contacts. Its extreme thinness enables nearly all light to pass through across a wide range of wavelengths. Moreover, graphene is nontoxic to biological systems, an improvement over previous research into transparent electrical contacts that are much thicker, rigid, difficult to manufacture and reliant on potentially toxic metal alloys.
The technology demonstration draws upon three cutting-edge research fields: graphene, which earned researchers the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics; super-resolved fluorescent microscopy, which earned researchers the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry; and optogenetics, which involves genetically modifying cells to create specific light-reactive proteins.

RE-NET seeks to develop new tools and technologies to understand and overcome the failure mechanisms of neural interfaces. DARPA is interested in advancing next-generation neurotechnologies for revealing the relationship between neural network structure and function. RE-NET, and subsequent DARPA programs in this field, plan to leverage this new tool by simultaneously measuring the function, physical motion and behavior of neurons in freely moving subjects. This technology provides the capability to modulate neural function, by applying programmed pulses of electricity or light to temporarily activate neurons. Therefore, it could not only provide better observation of native functionality but also, through careful modulation of circuit activity, enable exploration of causal relationships between neural signals and brain function.
“Historically, researchers have been limited to correlational studies that suggest, but do not prove causal linkages between neural activity and behavior,” Weber said. “Now, we have the opportunity to directly see, measure and stimulate neural circuits to explore these relationships and develop and validate models of brain circuit function. This knowledge could greatly aid how we understand and treat brain injury and disease.”
RE-NET is part of a broader portfolio of programs within DARPA that support President Obama’s brain initiative. These programs include ongoing efforts designed to advance fundamental understanding of the brain’s dynamics to drive applications (Revolutionizing Prosthetics, Restorative Encoding Memory Integration Neural Device, Reorganization and Plasticity to Accelerate Injury Recovery, Enabling Stress Resistance), manufacture sensing systems for neuroscience applications and therapies (Hand Proprioception & Touch Interfaces,Electrical Prescriptions) and analyze large data sets (Detection and Computational Analysis of Psychological Signals).
Publication: Dong-Wook Park, et al., “Graphene-based carbon-layered electrode array technology for neural imaging and optogenetic applications,” Nature Communications 5, Article number: 5258; doi:10.1038/ncomms6258
Image: DARPA

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